TSSD

 

FOR THE "LITTLE BOY" IN ALL OF US

"THE GUYS" - FROM LEFT TO RIGHT

SPANKY - BIG ED - NASTY NICK - SMILEY JACK - STINKY PETE - THE HOLSTER KID

( PLEASE NOTE THAT THE CHAPS ARE ON BACKWARDS  ON NASTY NICK )

___________________________

 

THE PLAINS INDIAN WARS

___________________________

 

THE INCOMPARABLE JOE BAKER DOES IT AGAIN

TSSD PAINTED INDIAN WARRIORS

 "ON THE ATTACK"

 

TERRIFIC PHOTO BY JOE BAKER

_____________________________

 

 EMAIL ADDRESS 

tssd@sdsoldiers.com

 

PHONE:  760 - 723 - 6583

 

FAX:  760 - 723 - 6586

 

TSSD

847 CULLODEN COURT

FALLBROOK, CA 92028

USA

_________________________________________

 

WE ACCEPT PAYPAL  PLEASE SEND YOUR PAYMENT TO

 

themilitaryminiaturestore@yahoo.com

_________________________________________

 

2017

I opened my new "Custer's Last Stand" Playset I got for Christmas,

and this 62 year old man felt like a kid again.

It arrived before Christmas like you promised, and it is a beautiful set indeed!

It was my first full set I have ever purchased from TSSD,

 and I will continue to do business in the future with you.

Thank you,

Mark

_________________________________________

 

THE WESTERN BARN

 

FRONT LEFT SIDE          FRONT EXTERIOR WALL - WITHOUT ROOF OR RAMP          REAR EXTERIOR - WITHOUT ROOF

 

INTERIOR WITH ROOF OFF          FRONT / INTERIOR - WITH FRONT RAMP          REAR

 

FROM THE REAR, LOOKING TO THE FRONT          BARN FRONT           INTERIOR ( SHOWN WITH REV WAR SOLDIERS FOR SCALE )

 

THE NEW TSSD BARN - 3 PIECE AND HIGHLY DETAILED

 

 PAINTED - $ 50.

 

*****

THE DAMAGED HOUSE

BY INDIANS, COWBOYS, BAD GUYS....WHOEVER!!??

 

THE NEW TSSD BATTLE DAMAGED HOUSE - DESTROYED, FORMERLY A 2 STORY HOUSE

 

PAINTED - $ 40.

 

UNPAINTED HOUSE - $ 32.

 

*****

THE OUTHOUSE

( JUST LIKE THE ONE IN NICK'S BACKYARD !! )

THE OUT-HOUSE -  WHEN YA GOTTA GO, YA GOTTA GO! - GRAY.

 $ 12.

__________________________

 

AVAILABLE 

 

A VERY COOL AND FUN PLAYSET....LOADED AND AT A GREAT PRICE !!

 

"THE FIRST BATTLE OF ADOBE WALLS"

THE PLAYSET

NOVEMBER 25, 1864 - ONE OF THE LARGEST ENGAGEMENTS FOUGHT BETWEEN THE U.S. ARMY AND THE PLAINS INDIANS

 

AVAILABLE NOW !!!!

 

AND

 

COMING TO "OTSN - THE CHICAGO SHOW"

SEPTEMBER 24 THRU SEPTEMBER 27, 2015

*****

COMES IN AN ILLUSTRATED PLAYSET BOX

 

$ 185.

 

DISCOUNTED PRICE FOR THE FIRST 25 SETS SOLD !!!!

 

SAVE OVER $ 250.+ !!!!!!

 

*****

 

CONTENTS - SOME ARE BASED ON HISTORICAL DRAWINGS AND FACT

COLOR OF BUILDING MAY VARY FROM WHAT IS SHOWN ABOVE

WE JUST RECEIVED SOME THAT ARE 'ADOBE' COLOR

 

"ADOBE WALLS" - ONE OLD ADOBE WALLS BUILDING RUINS, ROOF GONE, WALLS DAMAGED

THE INTERIOR DIVIDING WALL IS A SEPARATE PIECE AND CAN BE REMOVED

 

 *NOTE

AT "THE FIRST BATTLE OF ADOBE WALLS" THERE WASN'T MUCH LEFT OF THE OLD TRADING POST BUILDING

THE BATTLE TOOK PLACE NEAR THE ABANDONED RUINS OF WILLIAM BENT'S ADOBE TRADING POST AND SALOON

FOR "PLAYABILITY" PURPOSES WE HAVE INCLUDED A PIECE THAT HAS A LITTLE MORE "USAGE"

YOU CAN OF COURSE ADD ADDITIONAL "OLD AGE / BATTLE DAMAGE" AS NEEDED

 

DSC04323.JPG (149478 bytes)

32 SOLDIERS

1864 U.S. ARMY SOLDIERS IN POWDER BLUE LONG COATS

 

 

CAISSON, CANNON, HORSES - PLUS 1 RIDER AND 1 DRIVER IN POWDER BLUE

( NOT TSSD PHOTOS - WE USED THIS TO SHOW THE CORRECT COLOR.   WE HAD TROUBLE PHOTOGRAPHING THE FIGURE COLOR FOR SOME REASON ? )

THIS SET IN THE POWDER BLUE COLOR HAS BEEN DISCONTINUED
 

 

 

MVC-NCW12P.JPG (28894 bytes)

# 12 ACW NAPOLEON CANNON - aka "THE 12 POUNDER"

( YOU WILL RECEIVE 2 TOTAL CANNONS IN THE PLAYSET, PLUS 1 CAISSON SET WITH HORSES AS SHOWN - COLORS WILL VARY )

 

 

DSC004796.JPG (158076 bytes)

ARTILLERY CREWMEN PLUS FOOT AND MOUNTED FIGURES IN POWDER BLUE AS SHOWN

 

6 WEAPONS IN 3 TYPES

DSC004749.JPG (154189 bytes)

CARBINES, COLTS & SABERS

 

 

4 "PARAGON" FIGURES - FROM "THE SCOUTS" SETS

2 OFFICERS IN "BUCKSKIN" AND MILITARY CLOTHING, PLUS 2 APACHE SCOUTS AS USED BY KIT CARSON

"KIT CARSON" AND THE APACHE SCOUTS THAT CAMPAIGNED WITH HIM

 

 

13 COMPLETE INDIAN FIGURE SETS

135+ PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS

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LOTS AND LOTS OF PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS - FOOT & MOUNTED -  LOTS  OF INDIANS....

2 SETS TSSD SET # 13, 5 SETS TSSD SET # 14, 3 SETS TSSD SET # 16, 3 SETS TSSD SET # 18

 

24 DIFFERENT INDIAN WARRIOR POSES

 

( AT THIS BATTLE, THERE WERE PERHAPS 3,000 INDIAN WARRIORS vs 300 SOLDIERS & SCOUTS )

 

INDIAN WEAPONS

DSC005435.JPG (143133 bytes)

100+ STONE  WAR CLUBS, LANCES AND ARROWS

 

*****

 

NEW

 

ADOBE WALLS BUILDING WITH RUINS

1864 U.S. ARMY SOLDIERS IN WINTER COATS

1864 U.S. ARMY ARTILLERY CREWMEN

FOOT & MOUNTED PLAINS INDIANS

1 CAISSON WITH 4 HORSE TEAM

100+ ARMY & INDIAN WEAPONS

APACHE ARMY SCOUTS

KIT CARSON AND AIDE

182 TOTAL FIGURES

2 CANNON

MORE....

 

 

EVERYTHING NOW COMES IN A LARGE, ILLUSTRATED PLAYSET BOX

 

$ 185.

_____________________________

 

NEW WESTERN TOWN DESIGN NOW AVAILABLE NOW

 

NOVEMBER 2015

 

"NEW-RAY" TOYS

 

DELUXE

WESTERN TOWN

PLAYSET

BOXED SET INCLUDES:

2 STORY BUILDING WITH OPENING ROOF & RAIL PORCH, GENERAL STORE BUILDING WITH ACCESSORY SUPPLIES, A BLACKSMITH SHOP, HORSE CORRAL FENCE WITH ACCESSORIES AND MORE, PLUS STAGECOACH, COWBOYS, SADDLES, HORSES.

$ 48.

________________________________

 

 

THE PLAINS INDIAN WARS

&

CUSTER'S LAST STAND

 

Plain-Indian-Wars-PACKAGING.jpg (111221 bytes)

___________________________

 

PHOTOS OF PARTIAL OTSN / CHICAGO SHOW DISPLAY

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FIGURE PHOTOS

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DSC005595.JPG (143867 bytes) DSC005598.JPG (151880 bytes)

_____________________________

 

CONTINUALLY REVISED AND UPDATED WITH NEW PRODUCTS

 

* REVISED & SUPERSIZED - AGAIN 

  2016

 

GET THE REVISED PLAYSET AT THE SAME PRICE  

 

NOW WITH SET # 24 !!!!

 

"CUSTER'S LAST STAND" PLAYSET

 THIS PLAYSET CONTAINS ALL THE NEWEST FIGURE SET RELEASES

 PLUS

A CHOICE OF HILLTOPS, AND ALL 62 FIGURE POSES !!!!

Plain-Indian-Wars-PACKAGING.jpg (111221 bytes)

CONTENTS:

INDIANS:

2 SET's # 13 = 24 FOOT INDIANS, SERIES I ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 34.00 )

2 SET's # 14 = 24 FOOT INDIANS, SERIES II ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 34.00 )

2 SET's # 16 = 12 MOUNTED INDIANS WITH HORSES ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 46.00 )

2 SET's # 18 = 24 INDIAN CASUALTIES  ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 34.00 )

1 - "CRAZY HORSE" CHARACTER FIGURE ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 9.00 )

 

ALL INDIANS COME IN "BUCKSKIN" COLOR ONLY

 

CAVALRY:

 

NOW COMES WITH

SET # 24

NEW MOUNTED CAVALRY    '8' FIGURE SETS

"AMERICAN CAVALRY HORSE SOLDIERS"

1860 - 1880

AVAILABLE IN LIGHT BLUE, MEDIUM BLUE OR GRAY - IN THE PLAYSET - YOUR CHOICE !!!!

EACH SET CONTAINS 8 RIDERS, 16 ARMS AND 8 HORSES !!!!

SHOWN WITH 4 "JUST RIDING" AND 4 "FIGHTING".

 

PLUS ALL THE ORIGINAL CONTENTS

 

1 SET # 10 = 6 TROOPERS AND 6 HORSES ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 23.00 )

1 SET # 12 = 2 MOUNTED CAVALRYMEN, 4 ARTILLERYMEN, 4 FOOT TROOPERS ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 20.00 )

2 SET's # 15 = 24 DISMOUNTED CAVALRYMEN ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 34.00 )

2 SETS's # 17 = 24 DISMOUNTED CAVALRYMEN WITH CASUALTIES ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 34.00 )

1 - "CUSTER" CHARACTER FIGURE ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 9.00 )

 

CAVALRY COME IN YOUR COLOR CHOICE = LIGHT BLUE OR GRAY

 

PAINTED HILLTOP - YOUR CHOICE!

 

CUSTER'S "LAST STAND HILLTOP" ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 49.00 )

OR

"RENO" HILLTOP ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 49.00 )

 

PAINTED "2 DEAD HORSE" BARRICADE ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 15.00 )

 

ACCESSORIES ( FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 75.00 )

CAVALRY AND INDIAN WEAPONS AND ARROWS

1 CANNON ( TO GO WITH THE 4 MAN ARTILLERY CREW IN SET # 12 )

2 DIFFERENT CAVALRY FLAGS WITH METAL POLES, U.S. CAVALRY GUIDON AND "CUSTER" DESIGNED GUIDON

FULL COLOR, ILLUSTRATED PLAYSET BOX, 29" x 17" x 5"

CUSTOM SIZED SHIPPING BOX

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE BATTLE

TIPS & SUGGESTIONS SHEET

FULL COLOR PRINT OF THE BOX ART PAINTING - WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

ALL ITEMS COME BAGGED IN PLAYSET BAGS

 

SUMMARY:

85 INDIANS ( INCLUDES "CRAZY HORSE" )

65 CAVALRY ( INCLUDES "CUSTER" )

20 HORSES ( CAVALRY & INDIAN )

ALL 60 POSES

170 FIGURES & HORSES TOTAL

CHOICE OF PAINTED HILLTOP - CUSTER HILL OR RENO HILL

  APPROXIMATELY 265 PIECES TOTAL

 

NOW - YOU GET MORE PLAYSET - FOR LESS - WITH THE ADDITION OF THE NEW SET # 24 !!!!

 

$ 325.

 

(  FULL RETAIL VALUE $ 500. - SAVE $ 175. WITH THE PLAYSET  ) 

 

SHIPPING TO BE DETERMINED

 

* PLAYSETS ARE NOT AVAILABLE AT WHOLESALE

______________________________

 

"CUSTER'S LAST STAND" PLAYSET
 
 
THE "MINI-SET" VERSION
 
Plain-Indian-Wars-PACKAGING.jpg (111221 bytes)
 
CONTENTS:
 
 
COMES IN AN ILLUSTRATED PLAYSET BOX
 
AND
 
THE UNPAINTED "LAST STAND" HILLTOP - COMES WITHIN THE SHIPPING BOX
 
 
 
SET # 15 - DISMOUNTED CAVALRY - LIGHT BLUE OR GRAY
 
SET # 17 - "DISMOUNTED CAVALRY WITH CASUALTIES" - LIGHT BLUE OR GRAY
 
SET # 13 - PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS ON FOOT - SERIES I
 
SET # 14 - PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS ON FOOT - SERIES II
 
SET # 16 - PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS - 6 MOUNTED INDIANS PLUS HORSES
 
SET # 18 - PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS "CASUALTIES" - NEW!
 
CUSTER AND CRAZY HORSE CHARACTER FIGURES - "LEGENDS OF THE LITTLE BIGHORN"
 
CAVALRY WEAPONS - COLTS, CARBINES AND SWORDS
 
INDIAN WEAPONS - SPEARS, ARROWS, WAR CLUBS
 
A TOTAL OF 68 INJECTION MOLDED PLASTIC FIGURES, AND 6 INDIAN HORSES
 
( INCLUDES THE 2 CHARACTER FIGURES IN "MARX" CREAM COLOR )
 
 
 
PERFECT FOR "THE LITTLE TROOPER" OR EVEN A "BIG" TROOPER!
 
 
$ 175.
 
 
PLUS $ 25. SHIPPING
 
 
FOR MOST CONTINENTAL U.S. LOCATIONS

_____________________________

 

* "MEDIUM BLUE" COLOR IS NO LONGER INCLUDED IN THE PLAYSETS

 

MEDIUM BLUE IS AVAILABLE IN ALL BAGGED SETS OF CAVALRY AND ACW UNION INFANTRY - NEW!

SET # 2, SET # 10, SET # 12, SET # 15, SET # 17

ALL AVAILABLE IN LIGHT BLUE, MEDIUM BLUE AND GRAY

DSC005565.JPG (147156 bytes)

______________________________

 

SCROLL BELOW TO SEE PHOTOS AND DETAILS

ALL FIGURE SETS SHOWN BELOW

ALL BUILDINGS AND TERRAIN PIECES DISPLAYED

AND ALL RELATED ACCESSORIES LISTED

__________________________

 

BOTH "CUSTER" AND "CRAZY HORSE" COME TOGETHER

 UNPAINTED

 

DSC005710.JPG (137596 bytes) DSC005712.JPG (150477 bytes) DSC005714.JPG (138355 bytes)

GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER - CHARACTER FIGURE IN CREAM COLOR

 
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CRAZY HORSE - CHARACTER FIGURE IN CREAM COLOR

 

ON SALE FOR THE FIRST TIME - LIMITED SUPPLY

 

SET OF BOTH UNPAINTED CHARACTER FIGURES

 $ 15.

 

 

 

 

LIMITED EDITIONS

"LEGENDS OF THE LITTLE BIGHORN"

PAINTED CHARACTER FIGURE SETS

DSC005698.JPG (126720 bytes)

 

DSC005651.JPG (146586 bytes)
DSC005654.JPG (163275 bytes)

CUSTER AND CRAZY HORSE - CUSTOM PAINTED SETS

BOTH FIGURES HAND PAINTED

$ 35.

_______________________________

 

BACK-IN-STOCK

 

PAINTED

THREE BUILDING STREET FRONT

( 25" long x 9 1/2" high x 6" deep )

AWESOME PAINT JOB AND DETAIL ON THIS UNIQUE STREET FRONT.

THE LEFT SIDE AND RIGHT SIDE ARE EACH 2 STORIES. ONE BUILDING IS WOOD SIDING, THE OTHER IS STONE.

THE CENTER BUILDING IS ONE STORY BRICK.

THE BALCONY, CLUMP OF BARRELS, CHIMNEYS & STOVEPIPES ARE SEPARATE.

THE BUILDING FITS SNUGGLY INTO THE BASE.

THE WOOD PLANK SIDEWALK RUNS THE FULL LENGTH OF THE BUILDING.

 

$ 78. 

___________________________

 

TSSD FIGURE SET # 18

 

"PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS WITH CASUALTIES"

 

 

THIS SET INCLUDES 5 DIFFERENT INDIAN CASUALTY POSES, PLUS A KNEELING CARBINE SHOOTER.

 

A "SET" INCLUDES 12 FIGURES IN 6 NEW POSES

AVAILABLE IN BUCKSKIN COLOR ONLY

 

TEMPORARILY

ON SPECIAL !!

 

$ 14.

( REGULARLY $ 17. )

 

 

 

 

CASUALTIES OF WAR

( ALSO SHOWN ARE FIGURES FROM SET # 17 CAVALRY CASUALTIES, AND 6 FIGURES FROM SET # 18, INDIAN CASUALTIES )

_____________________________

 

TSSD SET # 17

"DISMOUNTED CAVALRY WITH CASUALTIES"

THERE ARE 4 DIFFERENT "CASUALTY" POSES, PLUS A NEW PRONE SHOOTER AND A NEW OFFICER.

( OFFICER IS SUITABLE FOR "RENO" OR EVEN "T. CUSTER" - OR EVEN AN 'ACW' OFFICER! )

 

12 FIGURES IN 6 ALL NEW POSES

( DEAD HORSES NOT INCLUDED - ASK US HOW TO MAKE THEM! )

BAGGED SET - $ 17.00

 

 

AVAILABLE IN ALL 3 COLORS

( LIGHT BLUE, * LIMITED QUANTITIES MEDIUM BLUE, GRAY )

DSC005565.JPG (147156 bytes)

__________________________

 

( JUST WHEN CUSTER WAS FEELING PRETTY GOOD ABOUT THINGS, ALONG COMES....... )

THE

"MOUNTED PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS"

 

SET # 16

 

DSC006038.JPG (163620 bytes)

 

Header-2316.gif (92685 bytes)

"MOUNTED PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS" POSES

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( PHOTOS ARE OF RECENT "TEST SHOTS". THE HORSE BASES HAVE SINCE BEEN "THICKENED", AND THE BOW `N ARROW GUY WAS "ADJUSTED" )

SIX NEW MOUNTED POSES:

CHARGING WITH LANCE, FIRING CARBINE, ATTACKING WITH TOMAHAWK, FIRING WINCHESTER RIFLE, FIRING PISTOL and FIRING ARROW.

( THE "CHARGING" POSES LOOK THE BEST ON CHARGING HORSES.  THE "FIRING" GUYS SEEM TO WORK BETTER ON A HALTING HORSE - "TAKING AIM" BEFORE FIRING )

 

A "SET" INCLUDES 6 RIDERS AND 6 HORSES.

HEADER CARDED BAGGED SET - $ 23.00

 

( WE ARE ALWAYS TRYING TO KEEP COSTS DOWN, ESPECIALLY DURING THIS CURRENT ECONOMIC DISASTER. THE MOUNTED SETS ARE PRICED LOWER THAN THEY SHOULD BE, BASED ON ACTUAL COSTS TO MAKE THEM; HORSES ARE EXPENSIVE!!  AND NOW WE ARE PAYING THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS FOR "TESTING & CERTIFYING", PLUS "BATCH NUMBERING" AT THE DEMAND OF THE "CPSC". )

 

 

HERE NOW!!

NEW INDIAN "BAREBACK" HORSES

WE HAVE A FEW "EXTRA" HORSES AVAILABLE SEPARATELY

FROM

TSSD

DSC006005.JPG (136564 bytes)

2 NEW HORSE POSES IN 3 COLORS, BLACK, BROWN & "MARX" CREAM COLOR

"HALTING" & "CHARGING"

$ 1.75 EACH

___________________________

 

TSSD FIGURE SET # 15

DSC005211.JPG (141524 bytes)

"DISMOUNTED U.S. CAVALRY"

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6 ADDITIONAL CAVALRY POSES - 12 FIGURES PER SET

POSES INCLUDE:

KNEELING FIRING CARBINE, SLOUCH HAT * STANDING FIRING PISTOL STRAIGHT AWAY IN KEPI

CROUCHED SEATED POSITION FIRING CARBINE, SLOUCH HAT * JUST SNAPPED OFF A ROUND, SLOUCH HAT

RUNNING WITH CARBINE ACROSS CHEST, KEPI HAT * JUNIOR OFFICER, WOUNDED IN LEG, FIRING PISTOL, SLOUCH HAT

$ 17.

 

CHOOSE YOUR COLOR

LIGHT BLUE * LIMITED QUANTITIES IN MEDIUM BLUE * GRAY

DSC005565.JPG (147156 bytes)

* MEDIUM BLUE CAVALRY COLOR IS NO LONGER AVAILABLE IN THE PLAYSETS

JUST "BY THE BAG" ONLY

 

GREAT FOR CIVIL WAR AS WELL!!

DSC005212.JPG (153671 bytes)

NOW AVAILABLE PAINTED!

___________________________

 

TSSD FIGURE SET # 14

DSC005208.JPG (157265 bytes)

"PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS"

( SERIES II )

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6 ADDITIONAL INDIAN POSES - 12 FIGURES PER SET

NEW POSES ARE:

"RING HAND" FIGURE WITH FLAG - ( FLAG INCLUDED )

( CAN HOLD ALL INDIAN & CAVALRY WEAPONS )

 

KNEELING, FIRING BOW `N ARROW * ADVANCING WITH CARBINE * GETTING SHOT, STILL ON FEET, FIRING PISTOL

FIRING 1866 MODEL "YELLOW BOY" WINCHESTER * LOADING A CARTRIDGE INTO A CARBINE

$ 17.

NOW AVAILABLE PAINTED!

___________________________

 

TSSD SET # 13 

"PLAINS INDIAN WARRIORS"

( SERIES I )

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KNEELING FIRING PISTOL * ADVANCING WITH MUSKET * CLUBBING WITH STONE WAR CLUB

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STANDING, FIRING BOW `N ARROW * LUNGING WITH LANCE * FIRING CARBINE

 

THE BAGGED AND HEADER CARDED SET INCLUDES 12 NEW FIGURES IN 6 NEW POSES, 54mm, SOFT PLASTIC, "BUCKSKIN" COLOR. THE HEADER CARD PORTRAYS "FORT LARAMIE", WYOMING TERRITORY.

$ 17.

NOW AVAILABLE PAINTED!

___________________________

 

CALL FOR AVAILABILITY!

 

PAINTED FIGURE SETS

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( SHOWN ABOVE - SET # 13 PAINTED INDIANS )

 

 

SET # 13 - PAINTED FOOT INDIANS - SERIES I

6 IN 6 POSES

$ 48.00

 

 

SET # 14 - PAINTED FOOT INDIANS - SERIES II

6 IN 6 POSES

$ 48.00

 

 

SET # 15 - PAINTED DISMOUNTED CAVALRY - IN BLUE OR GRAY

6 IN 6 POSES

$ 48.00

 

 

SET # 16 - PAINTED MOUNTED INDIANS WITH HORSES

6 IN 6 POSES, WITH 6 HORSES

$ 84.00

 

 

SET # 17 - PAINTED DISMOUNTED CAVALRY WITH CASUALTIES - IN BLUE OR GRAY

6 IN 6 POSES

$ 48.00

 

 

SET # 18 - PAINTED FOOT INDIANS WITH CASUALTIES

6 IN 6 POSES

$ 48.00

 

CALL FOR AVAILABILITY!

 

* NOTE: THESE ARE HAND PAINTED - EACH SET WILL BE DIFFERENT

___________________________

 

MORE PAINTED........

 

SET # 10 - PAINTED MOUNTED CAVALRYMEN WITH HORSES - IN BLUE OR GRAY

8 IN 8 POSES, WITH 8 HORSES

$ 120.

 

 

FROM SET # 12

 

4 MAN ARTILLERY CREW PAINTED IN BLUE OR GRAY - $ 32.

 

4 DISMOUNTED CAVALRY PAINTED IN BLUE OR GRAY - $ 32.

 

 

* NOTE: THESE ARE HAND PAINTED - EACH SET WILL BE DIFFERENT

 

 

TO VIEW THESE AND OTHER PAINTED SETS

CLICK BELOW

 

VERY NEW PAINTED PLASTIC FIGURES

________________________________

 

AVAILABLE NOW!

 

PAINTED

"RENO HILL" TERRAIN PIECE

THAT AUGMENTS THE WHOLE "CUSTER" SAGA THAT WE HAVE BEEN DOING.

 

THIS PIECE IS PAINTED, AND IS SIMILAR IN SIZE TO THE "CUSTER HILLTOP" AS INCLUDED IN "THE LAST STAND" PLAYET.  WE HAVE "ENHANCED" THE PAINTING TO INCLUDE ALL ROCK PARTS.

MEASUREMENTS OF "RENO HILL" - NEARLY IDENTICAL TO THE "CUSTER HILLTOP" IN SIZE

25" LENGTH * 16" DEEP * 5" HIGH

 

THE "RENO HILL" HAS RAVINES SIMILAR TO THE MONTANA TERRAIN AT THE LITTLE BIGHORN, PLUS ROCKS & GRASS SIMILAR TO "THE LAST STAND" HILLTOP.  PLUS "RIFLE PITS" AS DUG BY THE 7th CAVALRYMEN THAT WERE "PINNED DOWN" ON "RENO HILL".

 

RENO HILL RIFLE PITS - TODAY

 

ALSO VERY "USABLE" FOR OTHER PERIODS & LOCALES!!

( THE "RENO HILL" CAN EASILY HOLD 30+ FIGURES, DEAD HORSES, EVEN A CANNON ON TOP )

 

 $ 49.

___________________________

 

  PAINTED "LAST STAND HILLTOP

TERRAIN PIECE FROM RENOWNED SCULPTOR KEN OSEN.  THIS PIECE  MEASURES APPROXIMATELY 26" long x 16" wide x  4" -  5" gradual rise. 

IT IS "LARGER" AND MUCH MORE "IMPRESSIVE" IN PERSON

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OVERHEAD VIEW OF 26" x 16" "LAST STAND HILLTOP"

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FRONT VIEW        REAR VIEW

( I'M SORRY.  MY PHOTOS DO NOT DO KEN'S WORK CREDIT! )

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SHOWN ABOVE ARE DETAILS FROM THE HILLTOP - THE SPENT SHELL CASINGS, HOOF PRINTS AND WILTED SUMMER GRASS.

 

$ 49.
 

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CUSTER HILLTOP - UNPAINTED - $ 40.00
 

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ACCESSORIES

 

CAVALRY WEAPONS AVAILABLE

CARBINE

SABER

PISTOL

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AVAILABLE IN 2 COLORS - *LIGHT BLUE OR GRAY.

$ 2.50 EACH

( MEDIUM BLUE IS SOLD OUT )

*( LIGHT BLUE - NEARLY SOLD OUT )

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"INDIAN WEAPONS"

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STONE WAR CLUB - .30 EACH

 

LANCE - .30 EACH

 

ARROWS - .30 EACH

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TSSD

CAVALRY FLAGS

2 FULL COLOR "GUIDON" FLAGS WITH METAL POLES - THE CUSTER-DESIGNED "CROSSED SABERS" GUIDON AND THE U.S. CAVALRY GUIDON.  

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YOU CHOOSE WHICHEVER FLAGS YOU NEED

 

CAVALRY FLAG & METAL POLE - $ 5.00 ea.

CUSTER FLAG & METAL POLE - $ 5.00 ea.

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CTS

# 12 ACW NAPOLEON CANNON - 12 POUNDER

( PLASTIC )

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CANNONS COME WITH 2 RAMRODS

$ 6.00

 

 

 

PENNCRAFT 

# 12 ACW NAPOLEON CANNON - 12 POUNDER

( METAL )

BLACK CARRIAGE / BRASS BARREL 

$ 14.50

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CTS

 

CONESTOGA COVERED WAGON

Terrific New Wagon - larger than the Marx Covered Wagon - includes TWO tops, Driver, Accessories, and FOUR HORSE Team, 2 Hitches, steel axles, opening tailgate ( perfect for those crisp, fall afternoon tailgate parties ), and more!

 

COLORS WILL VARY - $ 27.

 

 

 

CTS 

AMBULANCE WAGON

Great New Cavalry & ACW - or other period - Ambulance Wagon

Includes Two Tops, Accessories, two Horse Team, Driver w/Whip, Steel Axles

COLORS WILL VARY - $ 27.

 

 

CTS 

CAVALRY WAGON

SHOWN ABOVE. "U.S. CAVALRY" IS PAINTED ON THE WAGON TOP.

COMES WITH ACCESSORIES AS SHOWN.

COLORS WILL VARY - $ 27.

 

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TERRAIN PIECES AND BUILDINGS

FOR USE WITH THIS PERIOD

 

 

"TWO DEAD HORSE" BARRICADES 

AVAILABLE FOR SALE SEPARATELY

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"HELP A TROOPER". GIVE HIM SOME COVER!

 

PAINTED TWO DEAD HORSE BARRICADE - $ 15.00

UNPAINTED TWO DEAD HORSE BARRICADE - $ 10.00

( UNPAINTED NATURAL TAN )

( FIGURES NOT INCLUDED )

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WESTERN "STREET SCENE" BUILDINGS

 

WE HAVE RUN THE "BRICK" 2 STORY, 3 SIDED STREET / STORE FRONT IN NATURAL TAN

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$ 38.00

 

AND

 

THE COMPANION "WAREHOUSE" BUILDING IN NATURAL TAN.

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$ 38.00

( BOTH OF THESE WERE FORMERLY IN GRAY OR BLACK )

 

THESE ARE THE BUILDINGS THAT CAN GO SIDE-BY-SIDE, OR EVEN BACK-TO-BACK.

 

THESE ARE GREAT, IN NATURAL TAN, FOR ANY WESTERN SET-UP, LATE 18th CENTURY, EARLY 19th CENTURY STREET SCENES.

 

* ALSO AVAILABLE IN LIGHT GRAY OR BLACK

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TSSD's SET # 6

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16 FIGURES IN 8 POSES

AVAILABLE IN LIGHT BLUE OR GRAY

$ 22.

 

 

PERFECT FOR USE IN

THE FIRST BATTLE AT ADOBE WALLS

&

THE FETTERMAN FIGHT

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1/32 SCALE

STAGECOACH

EXPAND YOUR "WILD WEST" SETS WITH THIS GREAT PIECE ! 

THE WAGONS AND HORSES ARE 54mm

 THE SEPARATE COWBOYS SEEM TO BE MORE LIKE 60mm

 

STAGECOACH SET

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COMES BOXED WITH STAGE, 2 HORSES TO PULL THE STAGE, PLUS 2 COWBOYS AND A THIRD HORSE W/SADDLE.

NICE "GENERIC" STAGECOACH, AND DEFINITELY 54mm.  TWO DIFFERENT HORSES, PLUS SOFT PLASTIC HARNESSES.

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SHOWN ABOVE WITH TSSD CAVALRY FIGURES.

( NOT INCLUDED )

 

$ 14.

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BURNED OUT CABIN WITH CHIMNEY

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PERFECT FOR THOSE QUICK "HIT `N RUN" GUERRILLA WAR TACTICS!!

"PITY THE FOOL" THAT WAS DEFENDING THIS PLACE!

CHIMNEY IS A SEPARATE PIECE; ALL CAST IN NATURAL TAN.

WORKS WELL WITH THE STREET FRONT, ROCK FORMATIONS, ADOBE WALLS AND OTHER PIECES.

$ 25.

( INDIANS THAT YOU CAN HARDLY SEE NOT INCLUDED )

 

 

 

THE "SODBUSTER" HOUSE

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GREAT LITTLE "FIXER-UPPER" CABIN / HOUSE FOR ALL YOUR PRAIRIE NEEDS.

JUST NEEDS A LITTLE "TLC".

MAYBE A BRICK GUY FOR THE CHIMNEY?

CAST IN NATURAL TAN. THE ROOF DOES NOT COME OFF, BUT THE INTERIOR IS ALL OPEN.

$ 25.

( INDIANS THAT YOU CAN HARDLY SEE NOT INCLUDED )

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"THE DUKE" CABIN / HOUSE

( we're calling it "The Duke" in honor of John Wayne and his Movie "The Horse Soldiers"! )

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BY MOST ACCOUNTS, OUR BEST "FOAM" PIECE TO DATE

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REAR VIEW AND THE INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING THE "HARDWOOD" FLOORS AND FIREPLACE DETAIL

LIFT-OFF ROOF

FRONT DOOR MAY BE EASILY CUT OUT AND POSITIONED AS NEEDED

COMES IN 4 PIECES - THE CABIN, SHINGLE ROOF, WOOD FRONT PORCH AND SUPPORTS

 

TAN AS SHOWN

 

 $ 32.

 

*****

 

AVAILABLE PAINTED

 

"THE DUKE" CABIN - PAINTED

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REAR VIEW                                          INTERIOR VIEW

 

PAINTED CABIN

 $ 42.

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3 BUILDING

 STREET FRONT

( OR..."NEW ULM" MINNESOTA!! )

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LARGE STREET FRONT IN "NATURAL TAN" COLOR, COMPRISED OF THREE BUILDINGS IN ONE PIECE.  A "CLAPBOARD" SIDED 2 STORY, A 1 STORY BRICK BUILDING WITH AWNING, AND A 2 STORY STONE BUILDING WITH BALCONY.

EACH STREET FRONT COMES WITH A SET OF BARRELS, REMOVABLE BALCONY PIECE, 3 CHIMNEYS / STOVE PIPE, AND MIDDLE FASCIA BOARD. ALL OF THESE PIECES CAN EASILY BE INSTALLED WITH WHITE GLUE.

THE ENTIRE PIECE IS MOUNTED ON A "BOARD' SIDEWALK.

( SHOWN WITH TSSD 7th CAVALRY GUIDON TROOPER FOR SCALE; NOT INCLUDED )

 

UNPAINTED

STREET FRONT - $ 55.

 

*****

PAINTED

THREE BUILDING STREET FRONT

( 25" long x 9 1/2" high x 6" deep )

AWESOME PAINT JOB AND DETAIL ON THIS UNIQUE STREET FRONT.

THE LEFT SIDE AND RIGHT SIDE ARE EACH 2 STORIES. ONE BUILDING IS WOOD SIDING, THE OTHER IS STONE.

THE CENTER BUILDING IS ONE STORY BRICK.

THE BALCONY, CLUMP OF BARRELS, CHIMNEYS & STOVEPIPES ARE SEPARATE.

THE BUILDING FITS SNUGGLY INTO THE BASE.

THE WOOD PLANK SIDEWALK RUNS THE FULL LENGTH OF THE BUILDING.

 

$ 78. 

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THERE ARE MANY OTHER 'ADOBE' TYPE BUILDINGS AND PIECES AVAILABLE

CHECK THE  - "BUILDINGS & TERRAIN PIECES"

WEBPAGES

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THE LITTLE BIGHORN RIVER

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NEED A RIVER FOR YOUR CUSTER DIORAMA?  SURE YOU DO!!

THIS ACCESSORY PIECE IS THE PERFECT SIZE TO USE AS THE LITTLE BIGHORN RIVER.

 A PAINTED, SECTIONAL RIVER WITH SIDE BANKS. THE PIECES EASILY CLIP TOGETHER FOR A NICE, TIGHT FIT!

THE SET COMES WITH 2 LONG STRAIGHT SECTIONS, 2 SHORT STRAIGHT SECTIONS, AND 2 CURVED SECTIONS - TO FORM A "RIVER" NEARLY 4 FEET LONG!!

GET SEVERAL RIVERS TO MAKE A LONGER RIVER IF NEEDED.

 $ 22.

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NEW FROM

"NEW-RAY" TOYS

 

DELUXE WESTERN TOWN PLAYSET

BOXED SET INCLUDES:

2 STORY BUILDING WITH OPENING ROOF & RAIL PORCH, GENERAL STORE BUILDING WITH ACCESSORY SUPPLIES, A BLACKSMITH SHOP, GREAT LOOKING WINDMILL, HORSE CORRAL FENCE WITH ACCESSORIES - HAY - GRAIN - MORE, COVERED WAGON, STAGECOACH, COWBOYS, SADDLES, HORSES.

 

$ 45.

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MARX REISSUE

INDIAN ACCESSORIES

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SET INCLUDES HORSE WITH TRAVOIS, STRETCHED HIDE AND STACKED SPEARS WITH SHIELD.

BAGGED - $ 4.00

( HORSE COLOR WILL VARY )

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INFORMATION OF INTEREST

FOR THIS PERIOD

 

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, June 25th & 26th, 1876

( A BRIEF “OVERVIEW” )

In late 1875, Sioux and Cheyenne Indians defiantly left their reservations, outraged over the continued intrusions of whites into their sacred lands in the Black Hills . They gathered in Montana with the great warrior Sitting Bull to fight for their lands. The following spring, two victories over the US Cavalry emboldened them to fight on in the summer of 1876.

To force the large Indian army back to the reservations, the Army dispatched three columns to attack in coordinated fashion, one of which contained Lt. Colonel George Custer and the Seventh Cavalry. Spotting the Sioux village about fifteen miles away along the Rosebud River on June 25, Custer also found a nearby group of about forty warriors. Ignoring orders to wait, he decided to attack before they could alert the main party. He did not realize that the number of warriors in the village numbered three times his strength. Dividing his forces in three, Custer sent troops under Captain Frederick Benteen to prevent their escape through the upper valley of the Little Bighorn River . Major Marcus Reno was to pursue the group, cross the river, and charge the Indian village in a coordinated effort with the remaining troops under his command. He hoped to strike the Indian encampment at the northern and southern ends simultaneously, but made this decision without knowing what kind of terrain he would have to cross before making his assault. He belatedly discovered that he would have to negotiate a maze of bluffs and ravines to attack.

Reno 's squadron of 175 soldiers attacked the southern end. Quickly finding themselves in a desperate battle with little hope of any relief, Reno halted his charging men before they could be trapped, fought for ten minutes in dismounted formation, and then withdrew into the timber and brush along the river. When that position proved indefensible, they retreated uphill to the bluffs east of the river, pursued hotly by a mix of Cheyenne and Sioux.

Just as they finished driving the soldiers out, the Indians found roughly 210 of Custer's men coming towards the other end of the village, taking the pressure off of Reno 's men. Cheyenne and Hunkpapa Sioux together crossed the river and slammed into the advancing soldiers, forcing them back to a long high ridge to the north. Meanwhile, another force, largely Oglala Sioux under Crazy Horse's command, swiftly moved downstream and then doubled back in a sweeping arc, enveloping Custer and his men in a pincer move. They began pouring in gunfire and arrows.

As the Indians closed in, Custer ordered his men to shoot their horses and stack the carcasses to form a wall, but they provided little protection against bullets. In less than an hour, Custer and his men were killed in the worst American military disaster ever. After another day's fighting, Reno and Benteen's now united forces escaped when the Indians broke off the fight. They had learned that the other two columns of soldiers were coming towards them, so they fled.

After the battle, the Indians came through and stripped the bodies and mutilated all the uniformed soldiers, believing that the soul of a mutilated body would be forced to walk the earth for all eternity and could not ascend to heaven. Inexplicably, they stripped Custer's body and cleaned it, but did not scalp or mutilate it. He had been wearing buckskins instead of a blue uniform, and some believe that the Indians thought he was not a soldier and so, thinking he was an innocent, left him alone. Because his hair was cut short for battle, others think that he did not have enough hair to allow for a very good scalping. Immediately after the battle, the myth emerged that they left him alone out of respect for his fighting ability, but few participating Indians knew who he was to have been so respectful. To this day, no one knows the real reason.

Little Bighorn was the pinnacle of the Indians' power. They had achieved their greatest victory yet, but soon their tenuous union fell apart in the face of the white onslaught. Outraged over the death of a popular Civil War hero on the eve of the Centennial, the nation demanded and received harsh retribution. The Black Hills dispute was quickly settled by redrawing the boundary lines, placing the Black Hills outside the reservation and open to white settlement. Within a year, the Sioux nation was defeated and broken. "Custer's Last Stand" was their last stand as well.

 

READ MORE:  THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF GOOD BOOKS WRITTEN ABOUT ALL ASPECTS OF CUSTER, CRAZY HORSE, AND THIS BATTLE .  PLUS MUCH MORE INFORMATION ON WEBSITES, ASSOCIATIONS AND FORUMS.  IT’S NOT ONLY ADDICTIVE, BUT YOU CAN LEARN SO MUCH MORE, PLUS TRY TO FIGURE OUT “WHAT HAPPENED”??

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THE HUGER SPUR

CUSTER REPORTEDLY WORE SPURS THAT PREVIOUSLY HAD BEEN OWNED BY GENERAL SANTA ANNA OF ALAMO FAME.

CHECK IT OUT:

 

http://www.norfolkhistorical.org/insights/2002_spring/huger

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FORT LARAMIE

WYOMING TERRITORY

A MAJOR TRADING POST AND ECONOMIC HUB IN THE 1800's, SERVING TRAVELERS ALONG THE OREGON TRAIL.

IN THE 1840's THE U.S. ARMY TOOK OVER THE POST TO PATROL AND PROTECT TRAVELERS ALONG THE OREGON - CALIFORNIA - AND MORMON TRAILS.

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THE FIRST BATTLE AT ADOBE WALLS, TEXAS

( NOTE THE LONG COAT SOLDIERS UNIFORMS )

NOVEMBER 26, 1864

THIS WAS ONE OF THE LARGEST BATTLES OF THE INDIAN WARS BETWEEN U.S. SOLDIERS AND KIOWA / COMANCHE INDIAN TRIBES.

KIT CARSON LED AN EXPEDITION FROM NEW MEXICO INTO THE TEXAS PANHANDLE TO STOP INDIAN RAIDS OF WAGON TRAINS ALONG THE SANTA FE TRAIL.

HOWEVER CARSON'S GROUP OF ABOUT 400 RAN INTO 3 TO 5 THOUSAND INDIAN WARRIORS LED BY DOHASAN AND SATANTA. THE BATTLE WAS ENGAGED AND WAS CONTINUOUS FOR 6 TO 8 HOURS, WHEN KIT CARSON ORDERED A RETREAT FROM THE FIELD.

THE INDIANS ATTEMPTED TO BLOCK HIS RETREAT, EVEN SETTING FIRES TO THE BRUSH TO STOP CARSON'S MOVEMENT. BUT CARSON SET BACK-FIRES, AND HAD HIS RETREAT COVERED BY 2 MOUNTAIN HOWITZERS.

HAD IT NOT BEEN FOR THE "GUNS THAT FIRED TWICE" SATANTA SAID THEY WOULD HAVE KILLED EVERYONE ALONG THE CANADIAN RIVER.

I BELIEVE HIM.

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THE "ELK EBER" PAINTING

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A LOT OF GUYS HAVE BEEN TALKING TO US ABOUT THIS PAINTING, AND IT IS THE FAVORITE OF MANY COLLECTORS.  THERE IS CERTAINLY NO LACK OF "CUSTER" PAINTINGS OUT THERE!  RICH FISHER WAS KIND ENOUGH TO SEND THIS TO US.

WHEN CHOOSING ART, WE HAVE TO FIND SOMETHING IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN, OR PAY FOR LICENSING TO AN ARTIST OR FOUNDATION AS WE DID WITH THE CAVALRY PAINTING AND THE "CUSTER" BOX ART.

WE CHOSE A MORE CONTEMPORARY PAINTING WHICH FEATURED MANY OF THE THINGS WE WANTED TO PORTRAY - IN THE ART AS WELL AS IN THE FIGURES.  ALL THE PAINTINGS OUT THERE ARE TERRIFIC; MAYBE WE SHOULD HAVE USED THEM ALL!!??

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1874 BLACK HILLS EXPEDITION

A REMARKABLE PHOTO - COLUMN OF CAVALRY, ARTILLERY AND WAGONS COMMANDED BY GEN. GEORGE A. CUSTER - CROSSING THE PLAINS OF THE DAKOTA TERRITORY AND THE BLACK HILLS.

NOTE THE LONG TRAINS OF WAGONS, SEPARATE CAVALRY COMPANIES, CATTLE & HORSE HERD, AMBULANCE WAGON, SCOUTS AND FIELD ARTILLERY.

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THE BATTLE OF NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

AUGUST 19th - 24th, 1862

 

The Dakota War of 1862

 

WAS AN ARMED CONFLICT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND SEVERAL EASTERN BANDS OF THE DAKOTA PEOPLE ( also called the Santee Sioux ) WHICH BEGAN ON AUGUST 17, 1862 ALONG THE MINNESOTA RIVER IN SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA.

 

SKIRMISHES IN THE FOLLOWING WEEKS CLAIMED HUNDREDS OF LIVES. THE NUMBER OF NATIVE AMERICAN DEAD IS UNKNOWN, WHILE ESTIMATES OF SETTLERS WHO DIED RANGE FROM 300 TO 800 - ONE OF THE LARGEST TOLLS ON AMERICAN CITIZENS TO EVER OCCUR.

 

THE CONFLICT ALSO RESULTED IN THE LARGEST MASS EXECUTION IN U.S. HISTORY WHEN 38 DAKOTA MEN - CONVICTED OF MURDER AND RAPE, WERE HANGED IN MANKATO, MINNESOTA.

 

THIS WAS THE FIRST MAJOR ARMED ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN THE U.S. AND DAKOTA, THOUGH IT WOULD NOT BE THE LAST. IT IS ALSO REFERRED TO AS THE "SIOUX UPRISING", "SIOUX OUTBREAK OF 1862", "THE DAKOTA CONFLICT" OR "THE U.S. DAKOTA WAR OF 1862".

 

  

 

IN THE PAINTING, NOTE THE TOWN BUILDINGS AND HASTILY ERECTED STREET BARRICADES FOR THE DEFENSE OF THE SETTLERS. MUCH OF THE TOWN AND THE BARRICADES WERE DESTROYED BY FIRE, AND EVENTUALLY NEARLY 2,000 PEOPLE AND 153 WAGONS LEFT THE TOWN FOR THE SAFETY OF MANKATO, MN.

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THE FETTERMAN MASSACRE

DECEMBER 21, 1866

On December 21, 1866,  Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho warriors staged an ambush some three miles from Fort Phil Kearny. Ordered to rescue a besieged wood-wagon train, Captain William J. Fetterman and 80 men were decoyed over Lodge Trail Ridge by a small number of Indians led by the young Lakota Sioux warrior,  Crazy Horse, into a trap where over 1000 warriors waited in hiding.  Fetterman's pursuit over the ridge, in violation of Carrington's orders, led to the death of the entire command.

     The shooting started about noon, and was over by 12:30. Many of the bodies were found by Capt. Ten Eyck  that afternoon. They were stripped and mutilated much in the same manner as were the Cheyenne at the Sand Creek massacre earlier.  Indian oral history accounts indicate that Fetterman himself was killed by famous Sioux warrior, American Horse (Note: This is not the same American Horse who died at the Slim Buttes Battle of 1876).

 

TWO VERSIONS OF THE FETTERMAN FIGHT

SUBMITTED BY RICH FISHER

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TSSD'S "CUSTER'S LAST STAND"  DIORAMA - 1998

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WHEN YOU HAVE A FEW MINUTES...

SOME REAL INTERESTING READING

 

Battle of Little Bighorn: 

Were the Weapons the Deciding Factor?

 

It may be that the Battle of the Little Bighorn is the most written about subject in American history. For more than 120 years, people have speculated about how Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer and five companies of the 7th Cavalry were overwhelmed in southeastern Montana Territory by a combined force of Lakota and Cheyenne Indians on June 25, 1876. Yet, the controversy does not appear any closer to resolution today.

A number of reasons have been given for the defeat: Custer disobeyed orders, disregarded the warnings of his scouts, violated the principles of warfare by dividing his command, was ambushed or was the victim of a conspiracy; internal regimental jealousies caused the defeat; the regiment was too tired to fight; there were too many raw recruits or too many Indians; the Indians had better weapons; or the Army had defective guns. Most of the conjectures are moot, for they can be debated endlessly–with intellectual and emotional biases interfering with reasoned arguments. Given the nature of the evidence, however, one should be able to study the role the weapons played in the battle’s outcome with a modicum of objectivity.

During the battle, the 7th Cavalry troopers were armed with the Springfield carbine Model 1873 and the Colt Single Action Army revolver Model 1873. Selection of the weapons was the result of much trial and error, plus official testing during 187173. The Ordnance Department staged field trials of 89 rifles and carbines, which included entries from Peabody, Spencer, Freeman, Elliot and Mauser. There were four primary contenders: the Ward-Burton bolt-action rifle; the Remington rolling-block; the ‘trapdoor’ Springfield; and the Sharps, with its vertically sliding breechblock.

Although repeating rifles such as the Spencer, Winchester and Henry had been available, particularly in the post-Civil War years, the Ordnance Department decided to use a single-shot system. It was selected instead of a repeating system because of manufacturing economy, ruggedness, reliability, efficient use of ammunition and similarity to European weapons systems. Ironically, the board of officers involved in the final selection included Major Marcus A. Reno, who would survive the 7th Cavalry’s 1876 debacle on the Little Bighorn.

The guns were all tested for defective cartridges, endurance, accuracy, rapidity of fire, firing with excessive charges, and effects of dust and rust. The Springfield was the winner. The Model 1873 carried by the 7th Cavalry was a carbine that weighed 7 pounds and had an overall length of 41 inches. It used a .45-caliber copper-cased cartridge, a 405-grain bullet and a charge of 55 grains of black powder. The best effective range for this carbine was under 300 yards, but significant hits still could be scored out to 600 yards. A bullet was driven out of the muzzle at a velocity of about 1,200 feet per second, with 1,650 foot-pounds of energy. The trapdoor Springfield could hurl a slug more than 1,000 yards and, with proper training, could be fired with accuracy 12 to 15 times per minute.

The Colt Single Action Army revolver was chosen over other Colts, Remingtons and Starrs. By 1871, the percussion cap models were being converted for use with metallic cartridges. Ordnance testing in 1874 narrowed the field to two final contenders: the Colt Single Action Army and the Smith & Wesson Schofield. The Schofield won only in speed of ejecting empty cartridges. The Colt won in firing, sanding and rust trials and had fewer, simpler and stronger parts. The Model ‘P’ had a barrel of 7.5 inches and fired six .45-caliber metallic cartridges with 28 grains of black powder. It had a muzzle velocity of 810 feet per second, with 400 foot-pounds of energy. Its effective range dropped off rapidly over 60 yards, however. The standard U.S. issue of the period had a blue finish, case-hardened hammer and frame, and walnut grips. The Colt became ubiquitous on the frontier. To the soldier it was a ‘thumb-buster,’ to the lawman a ‘peacemaker’ or ‘equalizer,’ and to the civilian a ‘hog leg’ or ‘plow-handle.’ The revolver was so strong and dependable that, with minor modifications, it was still being produced by the Colt Company into the 1980s.

Overall, the soldiers were pleased with their weapons. Lieutenant James Calhoun of Company L wrote in his diary on July 1, 1874: ‘The new Springfield arms and ammunition were issued to the command today. They seem to give great satisfaction.’ Although most of the men drew the standard-issue weapons, it was their prerogative to purchase their own arms. George Custer carried a Remington .50-caliber sporting rifle with octagonal barrel and two revolvers that were not standard issue–possibly Webley British Bulldog, double-action, white-handled revolvers. Captain Thomas A. French of Company M carried a .50-caliber Springfield that his men called ‘Long Tom.’ Sergeant John Ryan, also of Company M, used a .45-caliber, 15-pound Sharps telescopic rifle, specially made for him. Private Henry A. Bailey of Company I had a preference for a Dexter Smith, breechloading, single-barreled shotgun.

It is well-known that Custer’s men each brought a trapdoor Springfield and a Colt .45 to the Little Bighorn that June day in 1876. Identification of the Indian weapons is more uncertain. Participants claimed to have gone into battle with a plethora of arms–bows and arrows, ancient muzzleloaders, breechloaders and the latest repeating arms. Bows and arrows played a part in the fight. Some warriors said they lofted high-trajectory arrows to fall among the troopers while remaining hidden behind hill and vale. The dead soldiers found pincushioned with arrows, however, were undoubtedly riddled at close range after they were already dead or badly wounded. The long range at which most of the fighting occurred did not allow the bow and arrow a prominent role.

Not until archaeological investigations were conducted on the battlefield during the 1980s did the extent to which the Indians used gunpowder weapons come to light. Modern firearm identification analysis revealed that the Indians had spoken the truth about the variety and number of weapons they carried. The Cheyenne warrior Wooden Leg went into battle with what he called a’six-shooter’ and later captured a Springfield carbine and 40 rounds of ammunition. The Miniconjou One Bull, Sitting Bull’s nephew, owned an old muzzleloader. The Hunkpapa Iron Hawk and the Cheyenne Big Beaver had only bows and arrows. Eagle Elk, an Oglala, started the battle with a Winchester. White Cow Bull, an Oglala, also claimed to have a repeater.

There were 2,361 cartridges, cases and bullets recovered from the entire battlefield, which reportedly came from 45 different firearms types (including the Army Springfields and Colts, of course) and represented at least 371 individual guns. The evidence indicated that the Indians used Sharps, Smith & Wessons, Evans, Henrys, Winchesters, Remingtons, Ballards, Maynards, Starrs, Spencers, Enfields and Forehand & Wadworths, as well as Colts and Springfields of other calibers. There was evidence of 69 individual Army Springfields on Custer’s Field (the square-mile section where Custer’s five companies died), but there was also evidence of 62 Indian .44-caliber Henry repeaters and 27 Sharps .50-caliber weapons. In all, on Custer’s Field there was evidence of at least 134 Indian firearms versus 81 for the soldiers. It appears that the Army was outgunned as well as outnumbered.

Survivors of the remaining seven companies of the 7th Cavalry asserted that the Indians were equipped with repeating rifles and mentioned Winchesters as often as not. Major Marcus Reno claimed: ‘The Indians had Winchester rifles and the column made a large target for them and they were pumping bullets into it.’ Although some white survivors claimed to be heavily outgunned, Private Charles Windolph of Company H was probably closest to the truth when he estimated that half the warriors carried bows and arrows, one-quarter of them carried a variety of old muzzleloaders and single-shot rifles, and one-quarter carried modern repeaters.

The Winchester, in fact, was almost a duplicate of the repeater developed by B. Tyler Henry, who was to become superintendent at Oliver Winchester’s New Haven Arms Company. The success of Henry’s rifles ensured Winchester’s success, and the primary weapon carried by the Indians at the Little Bighorn was either Henry’s model or the slightly altered Winchester Model 1866. Both fired a .44-caliber Henry rimfire cartridge. The Henry used a 216-grain bullet with 25 grains of powder, while the Winchester used a 200-grain bullet with 28 grains of powder. Velocity was 1,125 feet per second, with 570 foot-pounds of energy. Cartridges were inserted directly into the front of the Henry magazine, while the Winchester 1866 had a spring cover on the right side of the receiver. The carbine and the rifle had a capacity of 13 and 17 cartridges respectively.

Even though the board selected the Springfield as the top single-shot weapon, the Indians’ arms fared nearly as well in subsequent tests. The Springfields recorded 100 percent accuracy at 100 yards, but so did the Winchesters, Henrys, Sharps, Spencers and various muzzleloaders. At 300 yards, the Springfield .45-55 carbine’s accuracy dropped to 75 percent, while the repeaters fell to about 40 percent. Weapons such as the Springfield .50-70 rifle and the Sharps .45-70 rifle, however, still produced 100 percent accuracy at 300 yards. At 600 yards, both Springfields could still hit the mark 32 percent of the time, while the Winchesters and Henrys were almost useless at ranges over 300 yards.

In effect, all of these weapons fared equally well at short ranges. The Army’s Springfields had an accuracy advantage over the Indians’ repeaters at medium ranges (200500 yards), plus they were more rugged and durable. The long-range weapons the Indians had were too few (there is evidence of only one Sharps .45-70 at the battle) to make much of a difference. Their preponderance of repeaters increased the Indians’ firepower, but the repeaters were only good at short ranges. And the Indian narratives tell a story of a battle that, until the last desperate moments, was fought generally from long range (more than 500 yards)–a dubious advantage to the cavalrymen, since the relatively slow muzzle velocity of their Springfields meant a high trajectory that made chances of hitting anything slim.

Overall, the pluses and minuses probably canceled each other out. It has been said that the 7th Cavalry might have won had it still used the seven-shot Spencers it carried at the Washita battle in 1868, but the Spencers were no better in range or accuracy than the Henrys or Winchesters, and they carried fewer bullets. The contention that the Springfields suffered from a significant number of extractor failures was not borne out. Only about 2 percent of the recovered specimens showed evidence of extractor problems. Custer has been criticized for not taking along a battery of Gatling guns, but General Nelson A. Miles commented on their usefulness: ‘I am not surprised that poor Custer declined’ taking them along, he said. ‘They are worthless for Indian fighting.’

 Equipping the cavalry with another type of weapon probably would not have made much of a difference at the Little Bighorn.

What, then, was the reason that the soldiers made such a poor showing during the West’s most famous Army-Indian battle? While Custer’s immediate command of 210 men was wiped out and more than 250 troopers and scouts were killed in the fighting on June 25-26, the Indians lost only about 40 or 50 men. The explanation appears to lie in the fact that weapons are no better than the men who use them. Marksmanship training in the frontier Army prior to the 1880s was almost nil. An Army officer recalled the 1870s with nostalgia. ‘Those were the good old days,’ he said. ‘Target practice was practically unknown.’ A penurious government allowed only about 20 rounds per year for training–a situation altered only because of the Custer disaster. And the 20 rounds of ammunition often were expended in firing at passing game rather than in sharpshooting. The 7th Cavalry was not hampered by new recruits, for only about 12 percent of the force could be considered raw. What handicapped the entire regiment, however, was inadequate training in marksmanship and fire discipline.

It is a perplexing incongruity in a citizen-soldier army, but the vast majority of soldiers, when the time comes to kill, become conscientious objectors. It has been asserted that man is essentially a killer at heart, yet recent studies have found evidence quite to the contrary. Men, soldiers or not, simply have an innate resistance to killing. It is fairly well-established that when faced with danger, a man will usually respond by fight or flight. New studies, however, have argued that there are two other likely possibilities: posture or submit.

It is the posturing that has increased with the introduction of firearms to the battlefield. It is almost impossible for a man to shirk battle when at arm’s length from an enemy wielding sword or pike, but it is easier to remain aloof at rifle range. One has other options besides immediate fight or flight. The Rebel yell or the Union ‘hurrah,’ for example, were simply means to bolster one’s courage while trying to frighten the enemy. The loud crack of the rifle also served the same purpose, filling a deep-seated need to posture–i.e., to put on a good show and scare the enemy, yet still leave the shooter far away from a hand-to-hand death struggle. In reality, those good shows were often harmless, with the rifleman firing over the heads of the enemy.

Firing high has always been a problem, and it apparently does not stem solely from inadequate training. Soldiers and military historians from Ardant du Picq to Paddy Griffith and John Keegan have commented on the phenomenon. In Civil War battles, 200 to 1,000 men might stand, blasting away at the opposing lines at 30 to 50 yards distance, and only hit one or two men per minute. Commanders constantly admonished their troops to aim low and give the enemy a blizzard at his shins. Regardless, the men continued to fire high–sometimes intentionally, sometimes without consciously knowing what they were doing.

In Vietnam, it was estimated that some firefights had 50,000 bullets fired for each soldier killed. In the Battle of the Rosebud, eight days before the Little Bighorn fight, General George Crook’s forces fired about 25,000 rounds and may have caused about 100 Indian casualties–about one hit for every 250 shots. One of the best showings ever made by soldiers was at Rorke’s Drift in an 1879 battle between the Zulus and the British infantry. There, surrounded, barricaded soldiers delivered volley after volley into dense masses of charging natives at point-blank range where it seemed that no shot could miss. The result: one hit for every 13 shots.

Indeed, it was at times even difficult to get soldiers to fire at all. After the Battle of Gettysburg, 24,000 loaded muskets were recovered; only 12,000 of them had been loaded more than once, 6,000 had from three to 10 rounds in the barrel, and one weapon had been loaded 23 times! One conclusion is that a great number of soldiers are simply posturing and not trying to kill the enemy.

At the Little Bighorn, about 42,000 rounds were either expended or lost. At that rate, the soldiers hit one Indian for about every 840 shots. Since much of the ammunition was probably lost–Indians commented on capturing ammunition in cartridge belts and saddlebags–the hit rate must have been higher. Yet the results do not speak highly of a supposedly highly trained, ‘crack’ cavalry regiment.

High fire very plainly took place at the Little Bighorn, most notably on Reno’s skirmish line in the valley. Troopers went into battle with 100 rounds of Springfield ammunition and 24 rounds of Colt ammunition. About 100 troopers on Reno’s line may have fired half of their ammunition toward the southern edge of the Indian village. The 5,000 bullets only hit one or two Indians, but they certainly damaged the lodges. A Hunkpapa woman, Moving Robe, claimed ‘the bullets shattered the tepee poles,’ and another Hunkpapa woman, Pretty White Buffalo, stated that ‘through the tepee poles their bullets rattled.’ The relatively low muzzle velocity of the Springfield meant that the soldier would have had to aim quite a bit over the head of an Indian for any chance to hit him at long distance. If the officers called for the sights to be set for 500 yards to hit Indians issuing from the village–and did not call for a subsequent sight adjustment–by the time the Indians approached to 300 yards, the bullets would be flying 12 feet over their heads. As a comparison, the modern M-16 round, traveling at 3,250 feet per second, has an almost flat trajectory, and the bullet will hit where it is aimed with very little sight adjustment.

The soldiers’ difficulty in hitting their targets was also increased by the fact that the Indians stayed out of harm’s way for almost all of the battle. One archaeological field study located the Indian positions and discovered that nearly every location was 300 to 1,200 yards away from the troopers. Given the distances involved, the fact that soldiers tended to shoot high, the lack of marksmanship training and the conscious or subconscious posturing involved, it is not surprising that the troopers scored so few hits.

Arguably, posturing has been a factor at every gunpowder battle, as it most likely was at the Little Bighorn–but how about submission? It was drummed into the common soldier that he should save the last bullet for himself. He supposedly would place his Colt to his head, pull the trigger and go to Fiddler’s Green, rather than take the chance of being captured alive. Custer had even requested that his wife, Elizabeth, who often rode with the cavalry, should be shot by an officer rather than chance being taken by the Indians. As strange as it may seem, even with this dread of being captured, surrender attempts were made at the Little Bighorn fight. Indian accounts tell of white men who, at the last second, threw their hands up in surrender and offered their guns to the onrushing warriors. The Lakotas and Cheyennes were not swayed.

Given all these factors operating against the citizen-soldier, how could commanders ever go into battle expecting to win? The answer, again, lies not in the weapons the soldiers used, but in the soldiers themselves–and their officers.

Dividing up a command in the near presence of an enemy may be an act to be avoided during large-scale maneuvers with army-sized units, but such is not the case during small-scale tactical cavalry maneuvers. Custer adhered to the principles for a successful engagement with a small, guerrilla-type, mobile enemy. Proven tactics called for individual initiative, mobility, maintaining the offensive, acting without delay, playing not for safety but to win, and fighting whenever the opportunity arose. It was accepted that Regular soldiers would never shirk an encounter even with a superior irregular force of enemies, and that division of force for an enveloping attack combined with a frontal assault was a preferable tactic. On a small scale, and up to a certain point, Custer did almost everything he needed to do to succeed.

Problems arose, however, when tactics broke down from midlevel and small-scale, to micro-scale. According to then Brevet Major Edward S. Godfrey, fire discipline–the ability to control and direct deliberate, accurate, aimed fire–will decide every battle. No attack force, however strong, could reach a defensive line of steady soldiers putting out disciplined fire. The British army knew such was the case, as did Napoleon. Two irregular warriors could probably defeat three soldiers. However, 1,000 soldiers could probably beat 2,000 irregulars. The deciding factor was strength in unity–fire discipline. It was as Major Godfrey said: ‘Fire is everything, the rest is nothing.’

Theoretically, on the Little Bighorn, with a small-scale defense in suitable terrain with an open field of fire of a few hundred yards, several companies of cavalrymen in close proximity and under strict fire control could have easily held off two or three times their number of Indian warriors. In reality, on the Little Bighorn, several companies of cavalrymen who were not in close proximity and had little fire control, with a micro-scale defense in unsuitable, broken terrain, could not hold off two or three times their number of Indian warriors.

The breakdown stems from an attitude factor. Custer exhibited an arrogance, not necessarily of a personal nature, but rather as a part of his racial makeup. Racial experience may have influenced his reactions to the immediate situation of war. It was endemic in red vs. white modes of warfare and implies nothing derogatory to either side. Historically, Indians fled from large bodies of soldiers. It was Custer’s experience that it was much harder to find and catch an Indian than to actually fight him. Naturally influenced by his successful past experiences with small-unit tactics, Custer attacked. He was on the offensive. He knew he must remain on the offensive to be successful. Even after Reno had been repulsed, Custer was maneuvering, looking for another opportunity to attack.

The positions that Custer’s dead were found in did not indicate a strong defensive setup. Even after the Indians had taken away the initiative, Custer’s mind-set was still on ‘attack.’ Although a rough, boxlike perimeter was formed, it appeared more a matter of circumstance than intent. Custer probably never realized that his men’s very survival was on the line, at least not until it was too late to remedy the situation. The men were not in good defensible terrain. They were not within mutual supporting distance. They were not under the tight fire control of their officers. Custer’s troopers were in detachments too small for a successful tactical stance. When the critical point was reached, the soldiers found themselves stretched beyond the physical and psychological limits of fight or posture–they had to flee or submit.

Seemingly out of supporting distance of his comrades, the individual trooper found himself desperately alone. The ‘bunkie’ was not close enough. The first sergeant was far away. The lieutenant was nowhere to be seen. The trooper responded as well as he could have been expected to. He held his ground and fought, he fired into the air like an automaton, he ran, he gave up. Some stands were made, particularly on and within a radius of a few hundred yards of the knoll that became known as Custer Hill, where almost all of the Indian casualties occurred. When it came down to one-on-one, warrior versus soldier, however, the warrior was the better fighter.

George Armstrong Custer may have done almost everything as prescribed. But it was not enough to overcome the combination of particular circumstances, some of his own making, arrayed against him that day. Inadequate training in marksmanship and poor fire discipline resulting from a breakdown in command control were major factors in the battle results. Neither Custer’s weapons nor those the Indians used against him were the cause of his defeat.

This article was written by Greg Michno and originally appeared in the June 1998 issue of Wild West

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